Immigration and Customs Enforcement is far from infallible. When they make mistakes, though, honest U.S. citizens and others like yourself pay a steep price. You face deportation even when you did nothing wrong.

Wronged citizens face an uphill battle against the ICE bureaucracy. You bear the burden of proving your deportation was unlawful to gain readmission. However, it is a fight you can win through diligent and dedicated work.

How you get deported

Many factors come into play when deportation snares an innocent person in its net. The case burden can overwhelm immigration court judges and staff, leading to mistakes. ICE procedures sometimes result in documentation errors. The flawed systems mean thousands of people like you face wrongful deportation.

A major problem is that advocates for the deported can be difficult to secure. The government, in fact, has no mandate to provide defendants with legal representation. The result is, you are on your own in a no-win situation because you lack legal expertise.

How you can gain readmission

Your readmission is possible by proving the deportation was wrong. Navigating the legal bureaucracy is close to impossible for anyone without proper training.

You also can challenge your deportation through civil action. The federal government has general immunity from lawsuits. A deported defendant, though, can claim rights violations by individual officers and agents. Common violations include unreasonable search and seizures, due process and equal protection.

On top of the legal issues, deportation is a frightening experience to face alone. It takes an emotional, financial, mental and physical toll on you if you are not prepared.

How you can protect your rights and future

You are one person lost in a maze of an overworked and understaffed governmental body. It may seem that everyone understands the rules – both written and unwritten – except for you.

Self-education and advocacy are the keys to regaining your freedom. You fought hard to make a life for yourself and your loved ones in the United States. Now is not the time to stop.